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Dutch student sells his ‘data soul’ to highest bidder

Dutch student and artist Shawn Buckles has auctioned all his private data in an online auction to the highest bidder in order to prove a point about loss of privacy in the age of big data. Buckles set up a website with an online bidding system in March, the auction actually ended on April 12th.

He received 53 bids, news website The Next Web ended up as the highest bidder. For €350 ($483) The Next Web received his personal profile, location track records, train track records, his personal calendar, email and online conversations, his thoughts and consumer preferences as well as his browsing history.

Buckles told wired.com, The Next Web will use his data on it’s forthcoming conference to adress the pissue of privacy. The money is supposed to go to Dutch organization Bits of Freedom, fighting for digital rights.

Buckles also published a pamphlet on privacy, saying ‘Our right to privacy is at stake.’ and that the day will come we need the right to privacy.

Not all of his friends liked his move. Buckles told wired.com that some of them weren’t pleased about the fact he not only published his emails and chat logs, but their answers as well. Buckles not only decided to sell his own online data but theirs as well. The outcry of some of his friends seems to prove his point.

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Dutch student and artist Shawn Buckles has auctioned all his private data in an online auction to the highest bidder in order to prove a point about loss of privacy in the age of big data. Buckles set up a website with an online bidding system in March, the auction actually ended on April 12th.

He received 53 bids, news website The Next Web ended up as the highest bidder. For €350 ($483) The Next Web received his personal profile, location track records, train track records, his personal calendar, email and online conversations, his thoughts and consumer preferences as well as his browsing history.

Buckles told wired.com, The Next Web will use his data on it’s forthcoming conference to adress the pissue of privacy. The money is supposed to go to Dutch organization Bits of Freedom, fighting for digital rights.

Buckles also published a pamphlet on privacy, saying ‘Our right to privacy is at stake.’ and that the day will come we need the right to privacy.

Not all of his friends liked his move. Buckles told wired.com that some of them weren’t pleased about the fact he not only published his emails and chat logs, but their answers as well. Buckles not only decided to sell his own online data but theirs as well. The outcry of some of his friends seems to prove his point.