Trojans

According to ancient myth, the Greeks used a giant wooden horse with soldiers hidden in its stomach, to conquer the city of Troy. The Trojans mistook the object for a gift of the gods and underestimated the circumstances of the situation. The same method is used by modern day computer trojans: they are disguised as useful programmes, but at the same time they launch hidden attacks and copy, delete, block or alter data. Many Trojans infiltrate malware into the system which will stay active even when the Trojan itself is deleted. Others install backdoors to enable unauthorised access from an external computer to the infected system. The compromised computer can also be used as a bridgehead to gain access to other computers and systems.

According to ancient myth, the Greeks used a giant wooden horse with soldiers hidden in its stomach, to conquer the city of Troy. The Trojans mistook the object for a gift of the gods and underestimated the circumstances of the situation. The same method is used by modern day computer trojans: they are disguised as useful programmes, but at the same time they launch hidden attacks and copy, delete, block or alter data. Many Trojans infiltrate malware into the system which will stay active even when the Trojan itself is deleted. Others install backdoors to enable unauthorised access from an external computer to the infected system. The compromised computer can also be used as a bridgehead to gain access to other computers and systems.